The Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Arctic Skua
These birds, also known as ‘parasitic jaegers’ nest on dry tundra laying about 4 eggs. Like other birds of it’s kind, it is incredibly protective of it’s young and will fly at the heads of foxes and even humans to defend them.
They feed on smaller birds, rodents and insects. They display ‘pirate like’ behaviour throughout the year, harassing their victims.

The Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Arctic Skua

These birds, also known as ‘parasitic jaegers’ nest on dry tundra laying about 4 eggs. Like other birds of it’s kind, it is incredibly protective of it’s young and will fly at the heads of foxes and even humans to defend them.

They feed on smaller birds, rodents and insects. They display ‘pirate like’ behaviour throughout the year, harassing their victims.

Lazy

Hey everyone and awesome followers. Very sorry I haven’t posted anything for a while! I’ve been really busy moving house, working (I won’t bore you any longer).

But on the plus side, as I’ve been doing more of my Frozen Planet course I’ve got loads of interesting new facts and info on the polar regions to share with you. So hopefully you’ll not only like the new pictures and info on my blog but learn something from them too!

In the meantime, here is a lovely picture of an Arctic Wolf :) x

Young Eurasian lynx on the prowl :-)

Young Eurasian lynx on the prowl :-)

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’
You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!
There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.
Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’

You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!

There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.

Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Harp Seal
Harp seals (or saddleback seals) are a species of ear less seals that are native to North American and Arctic regions.
They spend very little time on land and are notoriously noisy, sociable animals. On land pups ‘bawl’ and ‘mumble’ to call their mothers, where as adult harp seals ‘growl’ and ‘warble’.
They have a thick coat of blubber to keep them warm and to provide energy when food is sparse. 

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Harp Seal

Harp seals (or saddleback seals) are a species of ear less seals that are native to North American and Arctic regions.

They spend very little time on land and are notoriously noisy, sociable animals. On land pups ‘bawl’ and ‘mumble’ to call their mothers, where as adult harp seals ‘growl’ and ‘warble’.

They have a thick coat of blubber to keep them warm and to provide energy when food is sparse. 

BBC Nature: ‘Macabre Duvet’

Least weasel finds morbid but unique way of keeping warm! :-)