Even beluga whales exfoliate!

Beluga with grey baby :-)

Beluga with grey baby :-)

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Beluga Whale’
These bizarre and amazing animals are known as ‘sea canaries’ for their high pitched twitter.
It has an unmistakable white colouring and a very bulbous head. They are highly sociable animals and travel in groups.
They inhabit a ‘circumpolar’ area in the sub-Arctic and Arctic seas, also being found along the coasts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.
The world population of Belugas currently stands at 100,000. This sounds high but is quite low compared to pre-hunting days.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Beluga Whale’

These bizarre and amazing animals are known as ‘sea canaries’ for their high pitched twitter.

It has an unmistakable white colouring and a very bulbous head. They are highly sociable animals and travel in groups.

They inhabit a ‘circumpolar’ area in the sub-Arctic and Arctic seas, also being found along the coasts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.

The world population of Belugas currently stands at 100,000. This sounds high but is quite low compared to pre-hunting days.

Facebook Notification……Narwhal just poked you.

Facebook Notification……Narwhal just poked you.

Narwhal traffic jam! :)

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Narwhal’
These fascinating creatures, known as the ‘unicorns of the sea’ are thought to have started the myth of unicorns on land, due to their horns getting washed up on beaches!
Nobody knows quite what narwhals use their horns for. It has been suggested that they possibly are used to spear food, fight other males or for defence.
They inhabit Arctic seas at all depths and tend to stay close to pack ice, where they maintain breathing holes through the sheets of ice.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Narwhal’

These fascinating creatures, known as the ‘unicorns of the sea’ are thought to have started the myth of unicorns on land, due to their horns getting washed up on beaches!

Nobody knows quite what narwhals use their horns for. It has been suggested that they possibly are used to spear food, fight other males or for defence.

They inhabit Arctic seas at all depths and tend to stay close to pack ice, where they maintain breathing holes through the sheets of ice.