WWF: The Importance of The Arctic & Harp Seal Slaughter

Despite the polar regions seeming so separate to the rest of our planet, they play a vital role in sustaining it.

If you want to know more about the wildlife and the work that the WWF is doing to help protect them, please visit this link below!

http://www.wwf.org.uk/what_we_do/safeguarding_the_natural_world/oceans/oceans_arctic/

On an extra note, hideous statistics have been unveiled of how many harp seals are brutally slaughtered each year in Canada. Newfoundland’s tax money contributed last year to the death of 70,000 seals! If you want to help, there is link on harpseals.org below to write to Canadian senators to plea for a stop to this cruelty.

http://www.harpseals.org/index.php

Lone harp seal surrounded by the dead carcasses of hundreds of harp seals.


This needs to stop!

Oyyyyy! Hands off my bitch!

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’
You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!
There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.
Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’

You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!

There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.

Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Mother seal answers the call of her pup :-3

Mother seal answers the call of her pup :-3

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Harp Seal
Harp seals (or saddleback seals) are a species of ear less seals that are native to North American and Arctic regions.
They spend very little time on land and are notoriously noisy, sociable animals. On land pups ‘bawl’ and ‘mumble’ to call their mothers, where as adult harp seals ‘growl’ and ‘warble’.
They have a thick coat of blubber to keep them warm and to provide energy when food is sparse. 

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Harp Seal

Harp seals (or saddleback seals) are a species of ear less seals that are native to North American and Arctic regions.

They spend very little time on land and are notoriously noisy, sociable animals. On land pups ‘bawl’ and ‘mumble’ to call their mothers, where as adult harp seals ‘growl’ and ‘warble’.

They have a thick coat of blubber to keep them warm and to provide energy when food is sparse.