Antarctic shrimp krill

Antarctic shrimp krill

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Leopard Seal
The leopard seal, known as ‘the leopards of the sea’ are the second largest species of seal in Antarctica. During the summer months, it hunts around the pack ice spending most of it’s time in the water. They are powerful and curious animals, they have been known to play with their food before eating it.
They have forearms and fiver-finger like bones similar to that of humans and birds. However these ‘fingers’ are webbed, helping them to propel through the water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Leopard Seal

The leopard seal, known as ‘the leopards of the sea’ are the second largest species of seal in Antarctica. During the summer months, it hunts around the pack ice spending most of it’s time in the water. They are powerful and curious animals, they have been known to play with their food before eating it.

They have forearms and fiver-finger like bones similar to that of humans and birds. However these ‘fingers’ are webbed, helping them to propel through the water.

Have an interesting fact taken from my Frozen Planet course for you followers!
That age old question, why is the sea blue?
Or the more accurate question is, why does the sea APPEAR blue?
This is due to light. Natural night is made up of several different colours, like you see in a rainbow. When the light hits the sea surface, the light at the end of red part of the spectrum is absorbed more than the blue. As a result, the deeper down you go into the sea, the more absence of red light. Blue light is not absorbed so much by the sea. This is why the sea appears blue!
Simple as that! :)

Have an interesting fact taken from my Frozen Planet course for you followers!

That age old question, why is the sea blue?

Or the more accurate question is, why does the sea APPEAR blue?

This is due to light. Natural night is made up of several different colours, like you see in a rainbow. When the light hits the sea surface, the light at the end of red part of the spectrum is absorbed more than the blue. As a result, the deeper down you go into the sea, the more absence of red light. Blue light is not absorbed so much by the sea. This is why the sea appears blue!

Simple as that! :)

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’
You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!
There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.
Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’

You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!

There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.

Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Even beluga whales exfoliate!

Beluga with grey baby :-)

Beluga with grey baby :-)

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Beluga Whale’
These bizarre and amazing animals are known as ‘sea canaries’ for their high pitched twitter.
It has an unmistakable white colouring and a very bulbous head. They are highly sociable animals and travel in groups.
They inhabit a ‘circumpolar’ area in the sub-Arctic and Arctic seas, also being found along the coasts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.
The world population of Belugas currently stands at 100,000. This sounds high but is quite low compared to pre-hunting days.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Beluga Whale’

These bizarre and amazing animals are known as ‘sea canaries’ for their high pitched twitter.

It has an unmistakable white colouring and a very bulbous head. They are highly sociable animals and travel in groups.

They inhabit a ‘circumpolar’ area in the sub-Arctic and Arctic seas, also being found along the coasts of Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Russia.

The world population of Belugas currently stands at 100,000. This sounds high but is quite low compared to pre-hunting days.

Facebook Notification……Narwhal just poked you.

Facebook Notification……Narwhal just poked you.

Narwhal traffic jam! :)