Beautiful Alaskan ice, National Geographic

Beautiful Alaskan ice, National Geographic

Phytoplankton is the foundation of the oceanic food chain. They are microscopic organisms which photosynthesise, creating energy which is passed down through the marine food chain. This is very important for maintaining the marine wildlife in the polar regions.

Phytoplankton is the foundation of the oceanic food chain. They are microscopic organisms which photosynthesise, creating energy which is passed down through the marine food chain. This is very important for maintaining the marine wildlife in the polar regions.

PASSED!

I got my results back from my Frozen Planet course and I passed! :-D really pleased and a big thank you to all you followers! This blog has really helped me with my course and I’m definitely going to continue with it. The polar regions are immensely beautiful and I intend to educate as many people as I can about how important they are to our planet.

- Han

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Have an interesting fact taken from my Frozen Planet course for you followers!
That age old question, why is the sea blue?
Or the more accurate question is, why does the sea APPEAR blue?
This is due to light. Natural night is made up of several different colours, like you see in a rainbow. When the light hits the sea surface, the light at the end of red part of the spectrum is absorbed more than the blue. As a result, the deeper down you go into the sea, the more absence of red light. Blue light is not absorbed so much by the sea. This is why the sea appears blue!
Simple as that! :)

Have an interesting fact taken from my Frozen Planet course for you followers!

That age old question, why is the sea blue?

Or the more accurate question is, why does the sea APPEAR blue?

This is due to light. Natural night is made up of several different colours, like you see in a rainbow. When the light hits the sea surface, the light at the end of red part of the spectrum is absorbed more than the blue. As a result, the deeper down you go into the sea, the more absence of red light. Blue light is not absorbed so much by the sea. This is why the sea appears blue!

Simple as that! :)

Lil’ polar bear family :-3

Lil’ polar bear family :-3

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Eurasian Lynx’
The eurasian lynx is the third largest predator in Europe after the brown bear and grey wolf. It is also the largest of the 4 lynx species and can consome 1 to 2kg of meat a day!
With it’s stealthy hunting technique it can bring down animals 4 times it’s own size.
In the winter, its fur is long and dense. It’s big fur-covered paws help it to move through deep snow.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Eurasian Lynx’

The eurasian lynx is the third largest predator in Europe after the brown bear and grey wolf. It is also the largest of the 4 lynx species and can consome 1 to 2kg of meat a day!

With it’s stealthy hunting technique it can bring down animals 4 times it’s own size.

In the winter, its fur is long and dense. It’s big fur-covered paws help it to move through deep snow.

Oyyyyy! Hands off my bitch!

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’
You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!
There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.
Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’

You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!

There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.

Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Antarctic Fact of the Day

Did you know…..

Antarctica is roughly the size of the United States! (plus a bit more). It’s huge!