Beautiful picture of Adelie Penguins near Esperanza Base in Antarctica
by Gaston Lacombe

Beautiful picture of Adelie Penguins near Esperanza Base in Antarctica

by Gaston Lacombe

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Leopard Seal
The leopard seal, known as ‘the leopards of the sea’ are the second largest species of seal in Antarctica. During the summer months, it hunts around the pack ice spending most of it’s time in the water. They are powerful and curious animals, they have been known to play with their food before eating it.
They have forearms and fiver-finger like bones similar to that of humans and birds. However these ‘fingers’ are webbed, helping them to propel through the water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Leopard Seal

The leopard seal, known as ‘the leopards of the sea’ are the second largest species of seal in Antarctica. During the summer months, it hunts around the pack ice spending most of it’s time in the water. They are powerful and curious animals, they have been known to play with their food before eating it.

They have forearms and fiver-finger like bones similar to that of humans and birds. However these ‘fingers’ are webbed, helping them to propel through the water.

Lil’ polar bear family :-3

Lil’ polar bear family :-3

WWF: The Importance of The Arctic & Harp Seal Slaughter

Despite the polar regions seeming so separate to the rest of our planet, they play a vital role in sustaining it.

If you want to know more about the wildlife and the work that the WWF is doing to help protect them, please visit this link below!

http://www.wwf.org.uk/what_we_do/safeguarding_the_natural_world/oceans/oceans_arctic/

On an extra note, hideous statistics have been unveiled of how many harp seals are brutally slaughtered each year in Canada. Newfoundland’s tax money contributed last year to the death of 70,000 seals! If you want to help, there is link on harpseals.org below to write to Canadian senators to plea for a stop to this cruelty.

http://www.harpseals.org/index.php

Lone harp seal surrounded by the dead carcasses of hundreds of harp seals.


This needs to stop!

Lazy

Hey everyone and awesome followers. Very sorry I haven’t posted anything for a while! I’ve been really busy moving house, working (I won’t bore you any longer).

But on the plus side, as I’ve been doing more of my Frozen Planet course I’ve got loads of interesting new facts and info on the polar regions to share with you. So hopefully you’ll not only like the new pictures and info on my blog but learn something from them too!

In the meantime, here is a lovely picture of an Arctic Wolf :) x

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’
You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!
There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.
Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: ‘The Elephant Seal’

You’d think that these flabby animals wouldn’t even go near water, but they can actually reach depths of 400 to 1,500 metres. They spend about 80% of their lives in the ocean, and they can even sleep underwater!

There are two species, the Southern elephant seal, and the Northern. By the end of the 19th century they both were nearly hunted to the brink of extinction but numbers have recovered since then.

Their ‘proboscis’ (elongated head lump thing basically) allows them to produce extremely loud roars during the mating season and also has lots of cavities, which reabsorb moisture from their inhalations. This is important as it helps them conserve body moisture at times when they are away from water.

Antarctic Fact of the Day

Did you know…..

Antarctica is roughly the size of the United States! (plus a bit more). It’s huge!


Penguin Love <3

Penguin Love <3

Amazing footage from the Frozen Planet!

Arctic Blog&#8217;s Animal of the Day: The Emperor Penguin
The emperor penguin is the tallest and largest of all living penguin species. They are best known for the long journey that the males make every year in order to mate and feed their babies.
Like all penguin species, they have a streamlined body to minimise water resistance and a barbed tongue to prevent prey from wriggling free from their grasp.
Their lifespan in the wild is typically 20 years, and luckily the are listed as &#8216;least concern&#8217; on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species.

Arctic Blog’s Animal of the Day: The Emperor Penguin

The emperor penguin is the tallest and largest of all living penguin species. They are best known for the long journey that the males make every year in order to mate and feed their babies.

Like all penguin species, they have a streamlined body to minimise water resistance and a barbed tongue to prevent prey from wriggling free from their grasp.

Their lifespan in the wild is typically 20 years, and luckily the are listed as ‘least concern’ on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species.